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resources in a way that makes the networks run well, i think if you look back at the hurricane katrina recommendations, they were for voluntary, flexible framework. we did not disagree with the goal of the fcc to keep the networks running. that is in every carrier's best interest. it is how you go about doing that. for us, when you look a storm of this magnitude, is having the ability to react, move assets around. carriers have to put in thousands of feet of cables to drag cables of to the rooftops to power generators so that we could have cell sites working. >> let's go back to katrina in 2005. what investment have wireless companies done to improve the reliability? >> in every instance possible, putting in backup power. we put towers in on church steeples, on the side of buildings in major metropolitan areas. in closets within buildings. it becomes difficult in certain areas to have backup power. the carriers try to put in batteries were the cannot put in generators. where they can put in generators, the put in as much fuel as allowed. when you are working with building codes or resi
in a way that makes networks run well. i think if you look back at hurricane katrina and the recommendations, those recommendations were before the flexible framework. that is what we were pushing. we did not disagree with the goal to keep the networks running. of course we do. it is in the industry's best interest. it's how you go about doing this. for us, when you look at a storm of this magnitude, it is having the ability to react. carriers that had put in thousands of feet of power cable to drag cable up to the rooftop. so that we can have these sites work. >> host: what have carriers on to be more reliable in emergencies? >> guest: we put towers and unchurched peoples and on the side of buildings in major metropolitan areas and, you know, in closets within buildings. and it becomes difficult and areas to help that backup power. yes, they try to put in batteries were they can't put in generators. they put it in with as much fuel as they are allowed. but when you are working with building codes and zoning restrictions or environmental laws and imitations, you know,
well. i think if you look back at the hurricane katrina recommendations before the fcc acted, those recommendations were for a voluntary, flexible framework. and so that's what we were pushing. we don't disagree with the goal of the fcc to keep the networks running, of course we don't. that's in every carrier's best interests, it's in the industry's best interests. it's just how do you go about doing this. and so for us when you look at a storm of this magnitude, it's having the ability to react, to move assets around. we had carriers that had to put in, you know, thousands of feet of power cables to drag, you know, cables up to the rooftop to power generators so that we could have cell sites working. >> host: well, let's go back to katrina in '05. what kind of investment have wireless companies done to improve their reliability during such emergencies? >> guest: sure. so you see carriers in every instance where it's possible putting in back-up power, and you can imagine instances where it's not. we put towers in on church steeples, we put them on the side of buildings in mayor metr
to 2005 and katrina and some other hurricanes? >> it is too early to make that assessment even now. it is never satisfactory for those out of service. we are going to have vulnerabilities. when you have power, when you have and the structure, they are going to be vulnerable to natural disasters, of course. but i think all in all, in terms of the response, what i am hearing, what i am sensing is that people see that deployment was made to do so and a lot of circumstances -- a lot of systems worked as well as they could under the circumstances. i think you will see improvements in terms of the result of the end of the day. >> joining us is paul kirby, a senior editor with telecommunications report. >> one of the issues that is, this week is about the powers. a few years ago, the sec adopted rules the were challenged in the court. the real art -- fcc adopted rules the were challenged in the court. two judges were skeptical and so the fcc abandon them. >> this situation, while tragic, really highlights why we do some of the things we do. yes, a backup power systems devin ilie were stra
in 2005 with hurricane katrina and some other hurricanes and natural disasters? >> guest: it is too early to make that assessment. things are being ramped up in a number of ways. we are going to have vulnerabilities. when you have the infrastructure, they are going to be horrible to natural disasters, of course. but i think all in all, in terms of the response, what i am sensing is that people see that deployments have been done and a lot of systems work as best as they can under the circumstances. i think we will see some improvement in terms of the results at the end of the day. >> host: also joining us today is paul kirby who is the senior communications editor. >> guest: the oral arguments between the judges on the panel seemed skeptical of the rules. you think we should pressure those rules in light of hurricane sandy? >> guest: i think these really reinforced by some of the things that we put forth -- why we do what we do and why we affirm some of those things. yes, backup power systems definitely, you know, they are in play here. if this affirms how codependent we are, even some pe
disaster we suffered, let's look back to even 2005 with katrina and some other hurricanes and natural disasters. >> guest: i think you will see it's too early to make that assessment because even now things are being ramped up, i think you would say. it's never satisfactory for those out of service. but in terms -- we're going to have vulnerabilities, you know? when you have towers, when you have, you know, the infrastructure, there are going to be -- they're going to be vulnerable to natural disasters, of course. but i think all in all in terms of the response, what i'm hearing, on what i'm sensing is people see that, um, deployments have been made as soon as it was safe to do so and that a lot of the systems worked as best as they could under these circumstances. so i think all in all you will see some improvement in terms of the results at the end of the day. >> host: also joining our conversation on "the communicators" is paul kirby who is the senior editor with "telecommunications reports." >> one of the issues is back-up power. >> guest: yes. >> a few years ago the fcc adopted r
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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